A Travellerspoint blog

Lake Taupo to Mount Ruapehu - Day 62

Journey to Mount Doom

18 °C

After 9 weeks away we needed a hair cut so we went to a little place in Lake Taupo and my hairdresser was from near Leeds! She had quite a strong accent and said the people there didn't understand her. She'd been in New Zealand for 6 months with her husband and young daughter and they'd just bought a house with a view of the lake in a month. Real estate obviously moves a lot faster here in New Zealand. Once we'd been trimmed, we went to around 5 charity shops to try and find a camp table - again - and we got one! Well, an old wooden cards table but with folding legs and a wipe-able top it was perfect.

Then we were back on the road again, driving around Lake Taupo, which is even prettier when you're not looking at it from the town.

We stopped for lunch on the lake and then again in a small town called Turangi, for the isite (the visitors centres they have across New Zealand, so handy and helpful) to book a trip to Waitomo Caves to see the glow worms in a couple of days. The woman was lovely and really helpful but had a very strange accent. She told us a drive we wanted to do up Mount Ruapehu - Mount Doom to Lord of the Rings fans - was very 'shen-ic' and it would take about 'fefttein minits' to drive it.

Mount Ruapehu is in Tongariro National Park and we saw a few of the beautiful, big mountains on our way to the campsite.

We stayed at Mangawhero, in the national park, which is on the flanks of Mount Ruapehu and we could see it in the background. We got some pictures of our new table at the campground. We're pretty smug about it, as you can see :)

Also, because I missed a fantastic picture opportunity in Bolivia, of Andrew in his shorts and leg warmers, here is a picture of him wearing them with his trousers. Much colder here than in north Bolivia!

Posted by staceywaugh 05:07 Archived in New Zealand Tagged mountains lakes leg_warmers camp_table

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